The Hostile Hospital…

Check out Lemony Snicket’s eighth book in A Series of Unfortunate Events titled The Hostile Hospital.  The formula is very different.  The action is intense.  Even the baby is using more words.  My favorite (but a bit depressing quote) from this book was when the author suggests, “The sad truth is the truth is sad.”  Pick up a copy and let me know what you think.

The Hostile Hospital…

The Ersatz Elevator…

I am continuing through Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events with The Ersatz Elevator.  Though this installment was probably my least favorite thus far in the series, there were still plenty of quotes worthy of sharing on my Twitter feed.  Anyone else read this series and care to share their thoughts on such a simple but creative concept?

The Ersatz Elevator…

The Miserable Mill…

It must have done in the early 2000’s, during the Harry Potter craze, that I read the first three books of Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortuate Events (I think my motivation was the release of Jim Carrey’s movie based on those novels).  I then either lost interest or lacked the time, but for whatever reason, I never returned to the books (even after my two oldest children read through the entire series just a few a years ago.

However, with the release of the Netflix original series – which the first season is based on the first four books – I decided to pick up where I left off.  The Miserable Mill is an easy and enjoyable read.  The author switches up the narrative a bit when he waits nearly halfway through the book to reintroduce the reader to Count Olaf.  He also concludes this story with a glimmer (no matter how small) of hope.  A few of my favorite quotes can be found on my Twitter feed.  Read the book, watch the series, and let me know what you think.

The Miserable Mill…

Marvel Comics: The Untold Story…

I recently listened to (and would recommend) Sean Howe’s Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.  Just for the record, my favorite Marvel hero is Captain America (second overall only to DC’s Superman).   Honestly, I was a bit disappointed the book did not invest more time on the actual storylines of premier characters (and more importantly, what motivated the writers, artists, and editors to go in the various directions in which they went.

That being said, some of the most intriguing topics that were covered would be…

  • Censorship.  The comic industry pushed the envelope at times – whether it be including sex and violence or addressing the sociopolitical tension of the day
  • Conflicts.  Marvel went from an underdog to an empire.  They constantly found themselves not only at war with the competition but also from within.  There were always battles – especially concerning who had rights to the characters.
  • Over-Saturation.  There were often far too many titles, characters, and storylines – especially in the ’90s.  However, for one reason or another, the industry refused to die (even with the rise of other media forms).
  • Marvel Films.  Stan Lee dreamed of seeing their universe on the big screen.  Nobody dreamed that they would have the large-scale success that they presently enjoy.

Overall, a fun (and extensive) look into a company.  Though it is not that high on my “to-read” list, I do plan to eventually pick up this book on the story behind Superman.

Marvel Comics: The Untold Story…